Seeta Aur Geeta (1972)

September 15, 2014

Once upon a time in masala filmland, families/siblings were routinely torn asunder (usually in Kumbh Mela, accidents or by the machinations of the evil villain) and brought together years later through inevitable coincidence. Sadly, families always seem to stay together these days. Be that as it may, as a card carrying member of Bollywood’s families-torn-apart-and-re-united party, I was, naturally, always alert to the possibility that I have missing family out in this big bad world. But it was in blogland that I finally met my long-lost masala sisters – Anu (Conversations Over Chai) and Madhu (Dustedoff). Anu and Madhu found each other years ago. My masala sibling-ness took a while to manifest itself – Anu and I both lived in Bombay, Madhu and I both live(d) in Delhi, all three of us had (mostly) the same thoughts about movies/songs/actors/books. But when Anu and I watched the same movie (five years apart) and found ourselves making the same comments on the film, it was time to face up to the truth – we were bicchdi behne indeed!

A re-union of masala sisters does not happen everyday. To celebrate this once-in-a-lifetime re-union, we decided to watch our favourite masala re-union stories. In order to spare you reading about the same movie thrice (of course, we all chose the same movie to review!) Anu decided to watch Yaadon Ki Baaraat (three brothers separated in childhood by an evil villain), Madhu went for Johnny Mera Naam (two separated brothers) and I settled for my favourite twin-sisters-separated-at-birth film.

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Anupama (1966) – romance Hrishikesh Mukherjee style!

March 11, 2014
anupama00180
Google moves in mysterious ways, its wonders to perform. You ask for information on a new film, and before you know it, you are knee deep in photographs of your favourite B/W onscreen couples! One such search led me to pictures of young Dharam and Sharmila – one of my favourite onscreen pairs. They are both incredibly good looking, excellent actors, and have several great films together. Anupama (The Incomparable One) has long been a favourite of mine, and tops my list of Dharam-Sharmila films. I love well-done romances and they’re seldom as well done as this gentle coming-of-age story of a timid and shy young woman. And no wonder. When Hrishikesh Mukherjee gets together with the likes of Rajinder Singh Bedi, Kaifi Azmi and Hemanta Kumar, one can really look forward to quality cinema.
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